July 15, 2022

Episode 276: Making Time for Weightloss

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We’re all guilty of this behavior some of the time. We’re rushing around, trying to get everything done. We think our whole morning has gone to hell, and all of a sudden, we’re telling ourselves…

“I don’t have time for that, it takes FOREVER!”

Well you know what? Thinking “I don’t have time” is a form of self-sabotage. It’s a story your habit brain is telling yourself. I don’t care if it’s making your 24-Hour Plan or emptying the dishwasher – chances are shit takes much less time than your brain is telling you it does.

In this short but powerful podcast, I coach someone around her story of not having enough time. We must STOP telling ourselves stories that keep us from reaching our goals.

So listen to Episode 276: Making Time for Weightloss, and share it with someone you know who needs this message.

Transcript

Corinne:

Hi, I’m Corinne. After a lifetime of obesity, being bullied for being the fattest kid in the class, and losing and gaining weight like it was my job, I finally got my shit together and I lost 100 pounds. Each week, I’ll teach you no bullshit weight loss advice you can use to overcome your battle with weight. I keep it simple. You’ll learn how to quit eating and thinking like an asshole. You stop that and weight loss becomes easy. My goal is to help you lose weight the way you want to live your life. If you’re ready to figure out weight loss, then let’s go.

Speaker 2:

We’ll go ahead and move on to Grace. Good morning, Grace. You want to unmute and ask your question.

Grace:

Hi. Good morning. First, Corinne, thank you so much. I have grown so much as a person, and I feel like I’ve done a lot of the mental work that I’ve learned from you and love myself more than I ever have. So thank you. But I can’t get out of my own way in terms of my 24-hour plans. I’m good with eating Two to Two and Doable Hunger. A lot of times I make mental 24-hour plans every day, but there’s this block. And I listen, and some of the stuff you told Jess was very helpful for me. But I don’t know how to break through the lack of consistency in writing my 24-hour plans.

Corinne:

Well, let’s talk about it. What are you telling yourself about the 24-hour plans? Tell me your story around them.

Grace:

I don’t know what I tell myself. I think my story is more-

Corinne:

Well, just tell me right now what you think about… When I asked you, tell me your thoughts and opinions about the 24-hour plan. What’s your general thoughts and opinions?

Grace:

I love it when I do it. And I’m like, “This is great.” Because when I do it, I’m like, “Look, I follow through on a promise to myself.” And it just helps me focus.

Corinne:

But that’s after you do it. Tell me the thoughts you have about it right now, about having to do it that aren’t so great.

Grace:

I think a part of my struggle is I wake up late frequently, where I’m rushing to get ready for work. And then I feel overwhelmed and I’m like, “Oh, my God. I don’t have any time.” Even though I’m making it in my head, it feels like it takes forever where I know I could just write down eat Two to Two.

Corinne:

Well, that is the thought, it takes forever. So when you get rushed for time, your habit brain wants to tell you, “Oh, my God. That plan is going to take forever and we don’t have time.” That’s the only reason why you’re not consistent is that one sentence that you’re allowing to go unchallenged in your brain. So what you need to do is teach yourself. Here’s what I would do. I would make a plan and time yourself. How long does it actually take? So that you know that when your brain says that, you could say, “Oh, wait. On the days when I’m just in love with it, enamored and thinking it’s going to do amazing things for me, it takes seven and a half minutes. It takes four and a half minutes.” So that you give your brain an actual thing because your brain has gone to all or nothing thinking. It’s immediately black and white. The other thing that you could do is you could also say, “All right. On the days that I’m running late, here’s the minimum baseline.” The second like… Do you go to work?

Grace:

Yes.

Corinne:

Okay. So when you go to work, is it just all hands on deck, putting out fires until the moment that you don’t even get a break?

Grace:

Yeah.

Corinne:

Tell me about when you first walk in the door at work.

Grace:

I’m a teacher. So it’s just I’m on from the moment I walk in until the moment I leave.

Corinne:

Okay. So the kids are sitting there ready for you. You don’t get to put your purse down or anything?

Grace:

Oh, no. I can put my purse down. But when I’m running late to work, sometimes I literally ran in and I’m running to my classroom to make it on time.

Corinne:

All right. So we’re running down, we’re literally running. I want you to listen to the story.

Grace:

Okay.

Corinne:

This is how I picture you. You’re running late, you get out of your car, you grab your things, and you break into an Olympic full-on sprint. And you’re shoving children out of the way to make sure that you’re in the room on time. Is that what’s happening?

Grace:

Not shoving children and not consistently. Some days I’m running like that with the Olympics sprint, and some days I’m just feeling rushed. And I don’t have a lot of time, but I’m not running as late as that.

Corinne:

Okay. But I want you to think about the days you’re running late. This is important. I want you to think about the days you’re running late.

Grace:

Okay.

Corinne:

Do you actually grab your stuff and run through the hallways of your school?

Grace:

No, I walk.

Corinne:

Right. So this is what I’m talking about. I want you to listen to how your brain’s talking about it, “I’m running late. I have to run from my car to the room and start immediately.” And I’ve already debunked all of it. None of that’s even true. So you have to tell your story around when you’re running late in a way that doesn’t have you compromising on your goals. Now you could say, “There are days that I’m late. I feel rushed because I think I don’t have enough time. I get out of my car. I have to walk hurriedly to the classroom. I set my stuff down.” But I’m just wondering, even on those days, would you have time to grab your phone in your Notes app and write down, “Here’s what I’ll eat”?

Grace:

I’m sure that I could create that type of time. Right? Even if I wrote something someone suggested in the self-sabotage camp, where if they wrote, “Eat Two to Two for each meal,” and then just to continue the habit of writing a plan.

Corinne:

So you could grab a… So before the kids come in or while they’re coming in or whatever’s happening, you could at least grab a Post-It Note, write BLD in a line, Two to Two. You could write hunger. For everybody who’s wondering what Two to Two is, that’s what we used to call it. We don’t call it that anymore. But for argument’s sake, we’re just going to keep it at Two to Two right now. You could do that. So you’ve already proven to yourself, you don’t have to give up on your plan and you don’t have to break your habits and you don’t have to not orient your brain around what you’re going to do for the day just because you slept late. I just want you to see because you’ve been around for a while. Your self-sabotage story is telling yourself, “I don’t have time. When I’m late, everything has to go to hell.”

Corinne:

And then when you think everything has to go to hell, you even create a story around what’s happening that’s not even based in reality. You’ve never shoved a child down. You said, “I didn’t even actually run through the halls. I just lied to you, Corinne. I told you I ran from the car straight to the classroom.” I was like, “Bold-faced liar right here.” But when we tell our stories that way, we get anxious, we get jacked up. And the first thing we do when we have anxiety and stuff is we stop doing things that we think are good for us or extra. We just immediately go to putting out fires. Your 24-hour plan will never be a fire. It’s got to be something that you say, “I will do it because I deserve to spend at least 20 seconds on my busiest days telling myself I still matter. So I will write this down on a Post-It Note. And if that’s all I got for today, at least I know I did that.” That’s way better than not doing it at all.

Grace:

Thank you.

Corinne:

You’re welcome.

Grace:

That’s a really helpful reminder. Thank you, Corinne.

Corinne:

You’re welcome, Grace.

Grace:

And I don’t push children for the record.

Corinne:

All right. Thank you.

Grace:

Thank you.

Corinne:

Bye.

Speaker 2:

Thank you so much, Grace, for your question.

Corinne:

Thank you so much for listening today. Make sure you head on over to nobsfreecourse.com and sign up for my free weight loss training on what you need to know to start losing your weight right now. You’ll also find lots of notes and resources from our past podcasts help you lose your weight without all the bullshit diet advice. I’ll see you next week.

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I'm Corinne Crabtree

Corinne Crabtree, top-rated podcaster, has helped millions of women lose weight by blending common-sense methods with behavior-based psychology.

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