March 5, 2021

Episode 205: The Number One Reason Diets Fail

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Why Diets Don’t Work

One of the biggest questions I get asked is, “Corinne, why do I always quit my diets? Why don’t diets work for me?”

You’re definitely overcomplicating the reason why this happens.

You say these kinds of things to yourself over and over:

“I never finish what I start.”

“I’m not good enough at dieting to keep going when it gets hard.”

“I have absolutely no self-control when it comes to pizza, chocolate cake, potato chips, or insert your favorite food here.”

This is a load of crap. You’ve been taught by the diet industry not to trust your body’s natural hunger signals.

There’s another question I get asked that I find even more interesting.

“Corinne, why do I quit my diet when it’s going good?”

I think you’re going to be surprised at how easy and practical the solution is. Best part, you can do it forever.

No, it doesn’t involve counting points or drinking expensive shakes.

 

In today’s podcast, I’m giving you the major reason why diets don’t work and the simple way to get started fixing it.

Get the Free Course here.


Topics discussed in this episode:

Topic 1: How letting go of the idea that you’re too broken or too old to lose weight actually helps you get started sooner. [00:00 – 09:59]

Topic 2: How applying “the cycle of change” to your weightloss can be helpful in taking action. [10:01 – 11:37]

Topic 3: How to walk through the stages of “the cycle of change” and how it can be applied to losing weight with compassion and acceptance. [11:39 – 16:04]

Topic 4: Why the relapse phase can come up when you’re being successful at weightloss and other helpful suggestions to keep you going no matter what. [17:19 – 32:56]


Resources mentioned in this episode:

I Am Diosa [02:36 – 02:54]

Transcript

Corinne:

Hello, everybody. Welcome back. Kathy and I have a very interesting podcast for you today. We’re going to talk about a session that we had inside the No BS Weightloss Program. Let me just explain a little bit how things work when you’re a member. We have our flagship program called the No BS Weightloss course. When you join the program, the very first thing you’re going to do, is you’re going to go through my program.

It not only teaches you the four basics, which you learn a lot about and what we’re going to talk about today in the podcast, but you move on to the other stages of weight loss that are super important. Most of us diet our entire life with counting calories, cutting out food groups. A trainer gives us a workout and a meal plan to follow. We do a lot of things to lose weight. That’s all fine and good, and that’s why I do teach you my four simple steps for weight loss so that you don’t have anything complicated. 

You don’t have to do the math, all that kind of stuff. If you want to learn more about the four basics, just pull any episodes where we talk exhaustively about four basics. The problem comes, is that we’re all overweight, not because we don’t have a good plan that someone gave us or that we have our macros counted, or that we know exactly how many calories we’re going to eat for the day. The problems come when we want to clean our plate, because we always have since the moment we started getting a fork and a plate to eat with. 

The problems come in when you are someone who when you go out to eat and everybody else is eating appetizers and having the drinks and having the desserts and all this other stuff, where you just go right along with them because you don’t want to stand out like a sore thumb. The problems come in when you’ve been on your plan all day long, but you’ve also had a shitty day.

When it gets to be eight o’clock at night, and you’ve not had a break all day, and you’ve been sitting around worried about what everybody thinks, dreading the day tomorrow, because you know you’ve got a stack of problems coming at you, the only thing you’ve got and the only way you know how to care for yourself is to just be like, “Fuck it. I just need to eat something. I deserve it. I’ve had a big, bad day.” What I like to do is not only teach you four simple steps to losing weight, but I like to teach you how to navigate life.

I like to teach you how to start changing how you think about things. I like to teach you how to take an examination of what’s going on in your life. How are you thinking and feeling? Is there different ways to think and feel about things so that you aren’t so tempted to eat your face off at night? Start examining, why do I sacrifice my self-care? Why do I put myself last on the list? What’s going on there?

What is it going to take for me to get back on my own list, to stop worrying about what the other people think, so that I give myself a shot at being able to eat in a way that allows me to weigh the things I want to weigh? How do I really want to eat something and know that I don’t need to? I may just want to keep eating, but I don’t need to keep eating. My program is all about tackling, first, how to get you … Like, how do you lose weight without a bunch of bullshit tricks, tactics, calorie counting and stuff?

Then, how do we start dropping the bullshit mental weight? Because if you don’t drop your mental weight, you’ll never drop your physical weight. I’m always trying to teach you guys how to lose weight from the inside out, not from the outside, hoping that on the inside you’re going to feel better about yourself. The third big component that I like to teach is how do we drop bullshit overeating? Once we know what to do, and once we know how to think better, then we just have the normal, “I will not overeat because I’ve always used food for comfort.”

Or, “I will not overeat because I don’t like wasting food. I’ve always been a clean plate club girl.” Then the last big thing that I teach, that nobody in the diet industry seems to even give a fuck about these days is, how do I adjust to being thin when all I’ve ever done is diet my entire life? How do I maintain weight? How do I think about that? How do I not freak out when I’m wearing clothes I’ve never been able to wear before and not feel overwhelmed at all the choices? We go into all of that in my program.

I tell you all of this for a reason, because you take this course and you learn all these things. Then we also offer calls where you’re on a group coaching call with me and we are talking about, “All right, what’s going on? What do you need help with?” I either answer the questions or I coach where I help you find thinking that you couldn’t find on your own because you don’t know yet how to highlight some of the self-sabotaging thoughts that we all will go through as we lose weight.

The other day we had a call. It was called the Queen’s Club Call. The queens of No BS are the women who’ve lost at least 25 pounds or more, or are maintaining. They get a special call with me every month because we’re going to work on the things that get in our way when we’re past the newbie phase. We’re in the boring part of weight loss. We’re in the part of weight loss where the stalls and the plateaus happen. 

We’re in the part where we’re closing in on the last 10 to 20 pounds, or we’re in the part where we’re like, “Oh my God, the diet is now over. How do I just live like a normal fucking person?” We’re having this call. God, love this girl that came on. I can’t think of her name and I wouldn’t want to say it out loud, but she’s lost quite a bit of weight. She’s around 195 pounds and I’ve coached her before on some other stuff. She comes back and she’s like, “Hey, I just want you to know, you’re my girl, Corrine.”

She was like, “Remember when we coached?” I can’t remember exactly what we coached on, but it was about six months prior. She’s like, “Remember when we …” Oh, she’s a school teacher and it was in the middle of COVID and she was going to restart the new year. She’d always been a music teacher, at the last minute, she’s now a second grade teacher. She was-

Kathy:

Oh my goodness.

Corinne:

Yeah. She was like, “Oh my God, I don’t teach second graders. I teach music.” She was determined that they were trying to sabotage her and that they were failing her and all kinds of things. We coached on it and I said, “It’s so shocking to me that you’re not just telling yourself …” I asked her about like, “Well, are you a good teacher? Tell me about your music skills.” I think she was telling me how amazing she is. She’s like, “I really know how to connect with kids. They love me.” All this other stuff.

I said, “What’s hilarious is you are telling me about how the administration is screwing you over, rather than you coming on here and saying like, ‘Hey, I think I can handle this. I just want to thank you because I’m a bad-ass bitch who can adjust and figure shit out. It might not be easy, but I know I can do this because I have all these skills.’” That she just laid out. She’s like, “Corinne.” It was like a light bulb went on. She said, “I just want to let you know, I’ve been killing it.” 

She’s just like, “I’m an excellent second grade teacher. I never knew. I wouldn’t even have known that I could have been good at it had it not been for you, helping me see the only problem I was having is I was so focused on how somebody else failed me, that I didn’t realize how strong I could be for me.” That’s how our beautiful call started.

Kathy:

That’s amazing.

Corinne:

Then our amazing call went to shitsville real quick. We went right back to our old shitty thinking. She is stuck at 195, had been stuck there for a while now. I was asking her about, “Well, tell me why?” She’s like, “Well, I’m doing all the things.” I’m always like, “All right, nobody ever tell me you’re doing all the things.”

Kathy:

Don’t ever say that.

Corinne:

No one’s ever doing all the things. I don’t even do all the things. It is such a lie. Here’s how I know, when you say I’m doing all the things, here’s what you’re not saying. There’s always something I could challenge myself with. Because even let’s say that you are doing great epic shit, which a lot of people are doing great epic shit. It’s like, “Pat yourself on the back for that.” Also, be willing to be like, “Because I do such great epic shit, I bet there’s even something greater I could even be doing. Look at me.” 

That’s baller mentality and that’s what I’m always trying to coach people on, is weight loss happens when you can quit thinking you’re old shit and you switch gears to thinking like someone who’s actually going to lose their weight. We get stuck into thinking like someone who can’t, and someone who thinks they can’t lose weight will say, “I’m so frustrated the scale’s not moving. I’m doing all the things.” That’s someone who doesn’t believe they can lose weight.

Someone who believes they can, sits there and says, “Fuck yes. I know how to do a lot of epic shit. I’m doing so many new things than I ever was before. I bet I’m up for the challenge now. I used to not be. Today I am.” That is changing that mindset shift. We’re doing our call. She’s doing all the things. We coach on all the things and I just said, “All right. Let’s just get this real simple. Break down for me exactly what you’re eating.”

Because she was like, “Corinne, I’ve got six months’ worth of planners.” She’s filled it out. She’s doing so much more than most. I was like, “Good.” I was like, “This is what I love. When you can give me data, I can give you help.” I had her talk through her data and I was like, “Oh, this is really simple.” I said, “Here’s what you need to do. All that food you’re eating that you think you’re eating until just enough.”

I said, “I don’t think it’s enough anymore because your data is telling you that you’re eating enough to weigh 195 pounds.”

Kathy:

Exactly.

Corinne:

You got to eat less.

Kathy:

Yeah.

Corinne:

She was like, “No, that’s not me. I know it’s not me.” She was like, “Corinne, I can tell in my body, I’m eating enough and blah, blah, blah.” She was going on and on. I was like, “All right. Well, let’s talk about it.” I said, “Here’s what I want you to do. For two weeks, I want you to eat less than what you’re eating now. Even with you thinking you shouldn’t have to, even with all those things. I want you to hear all of that and just tell yourself, ‘I don’t know what I’m supposed to be doing.

I’m supposed to be trying things, but I don’t know what’s right, because I weigh less now than I’ve weighed in a long time. It’s probably changed. I’m going to see. If eating a little less is the solve to this thing.’” Literally Kathy, the chat was blowing up. They were like, “This is the best call ever.” Because you could see it on her face, panic and despair and freaking out was happening in front of all of us. She was slamming her desk and going like, “Are you serious? Blah, blah, blah, blah.”

I said, “What’s the worst thing that’s going to happen? For two weeks, some meals, eat half of what you’ve been eating. Some meals, leave a few bites behind. But every single meal, I want you to try eating less than what you think you should, because what you think you should, might not be true and we’re just going to test that.” She really wanted to argue the point with me about eating to enough. She said, “I know I’m eating to enough because it feels good.” I was like, “And that, my friends, is emotional eating.”

We wanted to talk to you guys today about … I know it was a long story to get here. We want to talk to you guys today about the difference between eating to enough because you physically got enough and eating to enough to fill your emotional tank. That is what my coaching client was doing, is that she didn’t realize that there was a difference between feeling comforted and calm and assured that that was enough food, versus my body has had enough, but my mind is probably going to freak out a little bit because this is new. 

I challenged her to start paying attention. I will tell all of you, one of the easiest ways for you to know if you’re eating to enough physically versus mentally, is to eat less at a couple of meals. Y’all, don’t hear this and be like, “Oh my God, every meal for the rest of my life, I’ve got to eat less.” Because that’s what most of us do. Our brain automatically freaks out at the hint that we’re not going to clean our plate or at the hint that we’re going to eat a little bit less than what we’re used to.

The problem is, is if the scale’s not moving after a few weeks, what you’re used to eating is now maintaining the weight that you’re at. I will say before I say any more about this, this is for my girls who aren’t still truly overeating. Don’t come to me with, “Well, I’m eating to enough all the time, except on my weekend binger.” Or, “Two nights a week I’m eating a lot more.” We cut that out first. I always tell people, “Don’t jack around with the amount of food you’re eating until you are very consistent with not having very intentional or unintentional overeats.”

Overeating past enough where you just aren’t sure, that’s one thing. I’m talking about work on true ass overeating where you’re sitting there going, “Well, more mashed potatoes would be good.” That’s not an enough thing. That’s a, like, “I just want more because it tastes so damn good.”

Kathy:

Yeah. Yeah. I’m kind of-

Corinne:

Here’s the … Go ahead.

Kathy:

I’m kind of dropping into the client mode here.

Corinne:

Go ahead.

Kathy:

Because I can identify with this person that you coached. I’ll just tell you some of the thoughts that go through my head when I think about if you were to tell me I have to eat 75% of everything, because I’m in the same boat as she is. I’m not 195 pounds, but I’m over my weight range and I’m not going down, but in my mind, I’m still following my plans. I’m not eating to … Here’s the key. I’m not eating to full, but I’m obviously eating past enough, okay? For me, what I’m noticing is there’s this gap in between.

I can ‘push’, using the air quotes, my little negotiator brain’s going off here. I can push enough and not get full, okay? There’s wiggle room there for me to not eat as much. I’m thinking about last night and I’m thinking about my little taco flatbreads that I make, that Ken and I both love. There were these little naan flatbread things with all the taco stuff on top. I was thinking, “What would I have thought if I had told myself, instead of eating two of those, I got one and a half and I had to set the other half apart?”

What would my brain start firing off on? It was things like, “But it tastes so good. Oh, it’s okay. This is healthy. You won’t be full when you’re finished. It’ll be okay.” It starts negotiating with me and it starts thinking, “You’re still on plan.” It’s so interesting to drop into my own head and listen to what I think in those same situations, because I bet that’s a lot of what she’s thinking too.

Corinne:

Well, there’s that, I agree. Yes. I think that that’s important. What I would encourage you to do, and what I encouraged her to do, is to stop overeating and start eating to truly enough and then have all those thoughts.

Kathy:

Yeah.

Corinne:

I watch this happen all the time with our clients. What they want to do is, “Well, here’s what I’d rather do. I don’t want to stop the overeating part just yet. I just want to get really aware of the conversation, so that I can keep my overeating habit because that’s comfortable.”

Kathy:

Yeah.

Corinne:

Anyway, what I was going to say to all that is, those are excuses and justifications and the normal chatter that we have. She’s eating to what she has decided, “This is enough because when I eat this amount, I don’t have to think that stuff.” I think that’s probably what you’re doing too. It’s like, “Well, if I eat two, then it feels like, well, I’m not full and I don’t have to have my bullshit chatter, so I feel really comfortable and I feel really good.” 

The problem is, is that when you first start losing weight … Even this girl, she’s halfway through her journey. It’s almost like starting over again a little bit. It’s like, “All right. If you want to maintain 195, yes, you can eat all this and stuff. Don’t spend all your …” And there’s nothing wrong with weighing 195. She has said, “I don’t want to weigh 195. I really want to lose weight because I’m frustrated all the time. I feel like I’m doing everything and I’m not losing my weight. I’m tired of that part. 

I’m tired of worrying about it. I’m tired of thinking about it and I’m tired of being frustrated by it.” Her little bit of comfort at each meal to eat to where she feels emotionally good about the amount of food she ate, causes her to pay the price all the other hours of the day when she’s wondering if she’s going to lose weight this week. I wanted her to flip it and just say like, “Let’s just do this. Let’s now truly eat enough for your physical needs and know that emotionally, it’s not going to do it for you at first.”

Her brain is naturally going to throw up, just like yours. If I told Kathy, “All right, Kathy, you’re the co-host podcast. The next two weeks, you got to eat half the food you’ve been eating. I bet it’s going to be plenty.” Well, Kathy’s going to spend two weeks listening to everything that she’s been eating through. That’s going to be hard and that part … But this is what I want to explain to all of you.

It’s going to be hard and it’s going to be uncomfortable, but it’s going to be doable when you just tell yourself, “That’s just my thinking coming up around it. Of course, it feels agitating. Of course, I’m freaking out a little bit that I’m not having enough.” But here’s what I want to tell myself, “I was comforting myself with eating a little bit more than I needed so I didn’t have to have these thoughts.” 

If I really want to be comforted in this moment, I just need to tell myself, “This is just some lingering thinking. We only have to try this for a limited amount of time. It’s either going to work or it’s not. Can I have enough patience? Can I just agree that this meal, all we got to do is eat half of this one or three quarters of this one, or leave two bites behind?” Whatever. Use a smaller plate. Whatever your tactic you’re going to use to eat less, so that you’re actually eating physically enough.

Then can I comfort myself with, “I know this is enough food, even if I keep telling myself it won’t be.” Or, “I know that if it’s not enough food while I’m figuring it out, I’ll add just a little bit more if I have to, but I actually want to see. I’m really wanting to see what the truth is, because the truth isn’t that this is enough. The truth is, I’m comforting myself to avoid this conversation.”

Kathy:

Yeah. That’s exactly right.

Corinne:

Tell us, you’re all in plan that you’re going to craft today.

Kathy:

Are we coming back in two weeks to check in on me?

Corinne:

No. I won’t throw you on that sword.

Kathy:

I will tell you-

Corinne:

Everybody gets to decide their stuff.

Kathy:

Yeah. I think it’s that chatter that makes us uncomfortable. You’re exactly right. It’s those thoughts that we eat through to eat those extra couple of bites. I even had the thought this week that maybe I need to take out all the breads again. My brain went down the, “Don’t do this. I’m going to have to restrict.” I was like, “No.”

Corinne:

What’s hilarious is like, “I should take all the bread out.” Other than like, “I should just leave half a naan behind.”

Kathy:

Right. Right. I think that’s what’s so funny about our brains, is … And the other thing that occurred to me, especially with your 195 pound girl, that was probably enough for her at 225.

Corinne:

Yeah.

Kathy:

Right? Or at 230. What her brain is doing is it’s looking in the past to those times when it was enough. It’s justifying that because it was enough then, it’s enough now. It’s just not. It’s over enough.

Corinne:

I think it’s something else that happens too. This happened with me a lot as I was losing weight. I will tell you, it happens a lot now. Now that I’m getting older, I’ve noticed I have to eat less food. I mean, just, my body’s getting older. It’s not building muscle all the time. It’s not trying to regenerate nerves. I wish it would, but it’s not doing a lot of labor like it did when it was younger, so it just doesn’t require as much fuel.

I think what happens too, is that we remember when we were a larger size, we did need that much food and this looks like it wouldn’t be enough. I think we have to just remember that we’re comparing to when we actually probably did need more or when our body required more or when our body could lose weight eating … Like I know for me, I was so severely overeating. I didn’t have to change a lot to make a big dent. It was like, I could just cut back half the ice cream. 

Because I always served myself a half a carton of ice cream or a carton of ice cream and I don’t mean … I mean the half gallon size. When I cut buck to eating half a gallon, or what would a … Like quarter of a gallon? That was a significant shift. I could keep other shit in. I remember when I went to McDonald’s and rather than ordering two cheeseburgers with mayo instead of mustard and a supersized fry and a McFlurry, when I cut it down to … I remember the first time I went and ordered a Happy Meal for myself.

Kathy:

Wow.

Corinne:

It was such a big fucking deal, but I was not ready to give up McDonald’s. I remember one of my first steps at McDonald’s was to no longer supersize. The next step was quit subbing mayo for mustard. Then I got to where I was like, “I wonder if I could do …” One of my favorite meals for a long time when I was weaning myself off of … McDonald’s is my jam. Y’all, I’m going to tell you right now. I’ve said this on many a podcast. I can still throw a Filet-O-Fish down or a number two. 

People always say, “Ooh, that tastes like shit.” I’m like, “No, I think it would slide down just fine.” I mean, I think all my old memories would come back and I’d be like, “Hello friend, where have you been?”

Kathy:

Probably send you right to the bathroom. No girl.

Corinne:

No. I mean-

Kathy:

[crosstalk 00:25:08].

Corinne:

No. One time Chris and I … This was a while back. We were having a date night and I told him. He said, “What do you want for dinner?” I was like, “I can just legit … Let’s do McDonald’s.” He was like, “Seriously?” I said, “No. I’m serious as a heart attack.” I didn’t have diarrhea. I’ve always had a pretty healthy pooper though. I just loved it. I mean, still to this day, if I smell the Golden Arches french fries, I’m like, “That smells good.” Anyway, I’ll get off that tangent.

I still remember one of my favorite jams for a long time when I was losing weight was I would go and I would get the Happy Meal, the hamburger Happy Meal and the comb.

Kathy:

Oh yeah.

Corinne:

It was such a huge level up from where I’d been. I mean, I was just basically going and saddling up to the McDonald’s buffet. Then as I made changes, I got to that point and then if everybody’s wondering what my next level up was, I stopped going to McDonald’s and I started going to Wendy’s. I was switched over from the Happy Meal and stuff to go into Wendy’s and I ate the chili and the baked potato forever. That was like … Corinne just wasn’t much of a cook back in the day. 

I had to lose a lot of my weight, not knowing how to cook, because that was for me one of the things I had to get over, was I always had a story that I didn’t know how to cook. I didn’t grow up cooking. I didn’t know much about it. It was a long time into my journey before I really started being someone that ate at home and cooked. I was convenience girl to the … It was one of the things where I realized at some point in my weight loss journey … I don’t remember how much I weighed.

I mean, I had already probably lost 50 pounds or something like that, where I was starting to get the inkling that … And I was exercising. That was when I was trying to do triathlons. I really wanted to be an athlete. That was a main driver for me for weight loss, was I just wanted to be someone that … I’d never been able to play sports. I’d never been the person … I sat on the bleachers in P.E. and stuff and I just dreamed of being someone that ran or biked and stuff. 

I remember thinking that I was going to have to learn how to cook because athletes probably didn’t eat the way that I was eating and I was willing to figure it out.

Kathy:

That was a level up for you.

Corinne:

It was a huge level up for me.

Kathy:

Yeah.

Corinne:

All of that was my level ups. All of it was … Like with this girl when I was … There were so many things that I kept for a long time that felt emotionally good and safe. There was this point where I knew that to really become … When I started shifting into someone who truly believed she was going to lose her weight and stuff, I had to let go of some of that stuff that maybe I didn’t need to be someone that just always said, “I just love drive-throughs.” Or, “I just don’t know how to cook.”

I had to start being a little bit like, “Okay. This is stuff we’re going to learn.”

Kathy:

Yeah. You were ready to make that little shift, right? You were ready to-

Corinne:

Sometimes I was ready. Sometimes I wasn’t ready. I think that that’s the other thing, is that there were lots of times when I was … Like in the very beginning, especially, I didn’t do anything unless I was ready for it, because I had failed so many diets that I knew for me, a big trigger was going to be that if I wasn’t ready to make the change, quitting was so in my DNA still, that I tried to minimize anything that would trigger me to want to quit.

I was always setting things up to be super simple and stuff. There was a point where I got to where I was feeling so confident in myself. I was really starting to notice I was truly changing. I was changing how I thought and stuff and so I started doing scarier things. I wasn’t ready for them yet, but I was willing, which is, I think very different.

Kathy:

That is very different. You probably helped your Queen’s Club coachee see that she needed to be willing before she was ready. Is that what you’re saying? She be willing-

Corinne:

Oh, for sure.

Kathy:

Yeah.

Corinne:

I’m going to tell you, anybody, if you’re a No BS woman, it’s the February … We did it, I think it was the February 14th. I think it was Valentine’s Day.

Kathy:

It was?

Corinne:

Okay. It was the February 14th Queen’s Club call. It’s in your private member podcast. It’s also in the video replace. You should watch it. You can tell by the look on her face. This was I think the biggest thing, because we had had such an epic coaching session six months earlier, and I had helped her see that she could do something she didn’t believe she could, she was ready on that call to say like, “All right. You didn’t steer me …” She literally said this, “You didn’t steer me wrong the first time. I’m going to believe you this time too. I’m just going to try it.”

She was honest. She was like, “I don’t like it.” I said, “You don’t have to like it. It’s just your thoughts. We just need to uncover every reason why you don’t like it, but give yourself a reason to do it and give yourself some purpose for it.” I don’t like changing the cat box, but I do it. I don’t sit around and do thought work on changing the cat box to where I’m highly excited and motivated. There are so many things that we do in life that we do it because we’re willing to do it.

We love the outcome. I love a fresh litter that I don’t have to smell in my office, and that litter box is far away. There’s a lot of things that you’re very willing to do, because if you think about it, it’s like, “All right. I will try this. I know I can. I don’t have to make it hard on myself. I don’t have to be dramatic about it. I don’t have to sit and think it’s going to suck. I don’t have to sit there and dread it. I don’t have to do all that kind of stuff.”

I can just say like, “This is what we’re going to do.” For her, one of the things I think that came into play was that if she couldn’t come to the point to where she was ready and up for the challenge and stuff, she was definitely ready to say like, “Well, Corrine’s not been wrong yet. I’m the one that’s been wrong. Maybe she’s wrong about this. Maybe I’m wrong about this one too.” She’s going to come back next month and let us know how the month went.

Kathy:

Awesome. Awesome. You have to follow up with her.

Corinne:

Do you have any other questions about it? Because I know this was a newer thing for you.

Kathy:

No. I just find it fascinating to watch our clients go through a lot of what I go through as well. It’s like one of the amazing things about being in No BS is that no matter who you are, you can take something from each coaching call and apply it to your life. As you were describing this, and I was thinking about my flatbreads last night, I was thinking about what I was thinking. It just makes a lot of sense to think. 

Sometimes you can just take the drama out of those last few bites and say, “Let’s just get curious about this. Let’s just think about this for a minute. If I do this for a week, I wonder what the scale will do wonder. I wonder how I’ll feel.” Because it’s just maybe if we just change things up a little bit, then we see a different result, but-

Corinne:

Well, one … Oh, go ahead.

Kathy:

No. I was going to say, sometimes you have to be really intentional and on purpose, put yourself in a frame of mind that allows you to do that.

Corinne:

Yeah. I think one thing that also helps on that is I love how you talked about seeing at the end of the week when I weigh in or whatever. Also, a concept we teach is that 10/10/10 concept where in that moment, I think sometimes we’re so bogged down to, “Oh my God, this is going to be terrible. I hate leaving this behind. I always clean my plate. It tastes so good.”

We are so caught up in that, that we forget to even give some equal airtime over to something else and just say like, “Okay. Corinne, is this three last bites that you’re anguishing over, are they going to matter to you in 10 minutes? Are they going to matter to you in 10 days? Are they going to matter to you in 10 months?” A lot of times that’s enough clarity to just be like, “Okay. Maybe in 10 minutes I’ll still be thinking about it, but if it’s three bites, I doubt it.”

Kathy:

Right. Right?

Corinne:

“Maybe for sure, in 10 days, I am not going to remember the three bites that I allowed myself to throw away for the greater good of losing some weight.” Whatever it is. I just think it’s … This is what I go back to. We teach so much here in the podcast and I get a lot of you, you get a lot of help out of the podcast, but the hardest part about the podcast is like, “Oh my God, it’s not all strung together in a easy simple plan.”

That’s what we do for you inside the membership. One of the things I want all of you to think about is, this is why in the beginning I told you, weight loss is not about the four basics. It’s not about keto. It’s not about counting points, calories, macros. It’s not about a detailed food plan someone gives you. That’s the boring ass part of weight loss. Weight loss is always going to be about those conversations that are going on in your head. 

That moment when you do need to leave some food behind, even if you’re not working with me, and let’s say, you’re listening to this, and you are someone who is on Weight Watchers. A lot of Weight Watchers people listen to this podcast and they combine it with that. Points. I actually asked this question to someone today who was … She was frustrated. She was like, “I just keep emotionally eating.” Like this week she had a really rough week.

She had caught herself just like she’s just in the shitstorm of a ton of big life-altering moments all at one time, which is always hard for all of us. Our brains don’t like life-altering moments. They don’t like it when the world is topsy-turvy on us. She was talking about, “Do you think I should just count macros? You know it’s worked for me in the past.” She’s like, “Come on.”

Kathy:

Wow.

Corinne:

I was like, “Let me just ask you this question. This week when you felt like shit and your days were long and hard, and you were hearing all this bad news, had you had macros, would you have just been like, ‘It’s all okay. I’ve got my macros.’”

Kathy:

That’s a good question.

Corinne:

She said, “Well, no.” [crosstalk 00:36:31]. I said, “I think we got our answer that the solution is not points and macros and plans. The solution is learning how to deal with life without food.” When you learn that, you lose all your weight, mentally and physically. All right, guys. That’s our talk about just exploring the idea between eating enough physically versus, are you eating enough to comfort yourself that you had enough?

Look into that, explore that and I bet you, you’ll unlock some little secrets. Just want to let all of you know that our next opening is March 31st. Be on the lookout in your emails. We are going to be doing a challenge beforehand. The signups start, I believe on … I’ll tell you just a second. I ain’t got my glasses on me here. Signups we’ll start on March 21st. You can’t sign up until then, but you can definitely look forward to it. 

You can tell all your friends about it. You can screenshot this podcast and tell everybody and their mama on your social media, they should be fucking listening to this podcast because it’s life-changing. We’re going to do a challenge this time called Take Control of Food. It will be a free week with me where you will have the opportunity to experience what it’s like to have some of this No BS life, and to have a clear plan and direction with everything streamed together for you so that you’re not having to piecemeal it in the podcast and stuff. 

Then we’ll open the doors to No BS on March 31st for anybody who wants to join. We’ll close them down on April 3rd, just know that we would love to have you. If you want us, we will be here for you. Other than that, y’all have a good week and we’ll talk to you soon.

UNLOCK THE SECRETS I USED TO LOSE 100 LBS

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I'm Corinne Crabtree

Corinne Crabtree, top-rated podcaster, has helped millions of women lose weight by blending common-sense methods with behavior-based psychology.

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Tried Everything to Lose Weight? I Did Too!

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