January 22, 2021

Episode 199: Taking The Big Leap into Weightloss (Book Review) 

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Breaking Through Your Limiting Beliefs About Weight Loss. 

Have you ever read something, and thought, “OMG! Why didn’t I know this shit sooner!”

That’s exactly what happened when I read the book, The Big Leap by Gay Hendricks.

As a self-development junkie, even I couldn’t believe all the mic drops in the book. It’s all about what is stopping you from living the life of your dreams.

This week, Coach Yesenia (one of our newest and the youngest No BS Weightloss Coaches) and I are talking all about The Big Leap. We chat up letting go of limiting belief, embracing your zone of genius, and how we teach our No BS women to break through their upper limits.

Not only are we going to learn more about Coach Yesenia, but she helped to kickoff our new No BS Book Study. Think of it as a book club with all your weightloss besties with a new author each month.

In today’s podcast, you’ll learn why reading The Big Leap is the perfect compliment to reaching your weightloss goals on purpose.

Get the Free Course Here

Topics discussed in this episode:

Topic 1: How No BS supports weightloss for women of all ages, and how we’re passionate about helping women in our membership in their 20’s and 30’s create healthy habits earlier in life. [0:00 – 2:28]

Topic 2: Why we launch a monthly No BS Book Study to support our members, and how we knew The Big Leap was the right book to break through their limiting beliefs (and upper limits) about weightloss. [6:44 – 20:55]

Topic 3: What your zones of genius and complacence are, and how it can be applied to losing your weight in an easier and more enjoyable way. [21:50 – 29:19]

Topic 4: A strategy that you’ll love to rewrite how you look at worry, and why it’s you controlling worry, instead of worry controlling you. [29:21 – 38:21]

 

Resources mentioned in this episode:

The Big Leap by Gay Hendricks [4:24 – 39:21]

The Body Is Not An Apology [5:00 – 5:16]

Worry Podcast [30:55 – 31:09]

Worry 2.0 Podcast [30:55 – 31:09]

Transcript

Corinne:

Hello, everybody. Welcome back. We have a special guest today. I have brought in one of our newest coaches. I don’t want to call her a baby coach, although [inaudible 00:00:12], how old are you?

Yesenia:

I am 29 years old.

Corinne:

She is holding it down for our youth, who happen to be in our membership, our [inaudible 00:00:21], which I am actually excited about because if you follow me, you may have heard me talk in the past about my babies in the tribe. I have a passion to help all women, but the younger girls, the ones that are coming into our membership in the age of the 20 to mid 30s, I just have a really soft spot in my heart for them because I just remember that was a time in my life not only that was hard, but I was trying to figure out the woman that I was going to be. It is such an important time.

Corinne:

When I was … I married Chris when I was 28. We got married around 29, and then I had Logan. My 30s was literally life-changing. It’s when my whole life took a new track, and I always think back to thanking myself for getting my shit together so that I wasn’t going to have to spend the rest of my life getting my shit together, like my mom and some of the impactful women who were in their 50s and 60s that I was looking up to.

Corinne:

I love that you’re there because I just think that anyone in their 20s and 30s who is doing this work, you should be so proud of yourself. Most-

Yesenia:

Thank you.

Corinne:

Women at that age won’t, and they’ll wait until their 40s, and then they’ll go, “Oh, God. Half my life’s over. Need to get my shit together.” And it’s like, let’s get our shit together early. Do it that way. Tell us about you, [inaudible 00:01:55], and just anything you want all the ladies to know.

Yesenia:

I keep hearing how good it gets when you hit 30 on. What are you talking about? This is when shit gets good, so I’m happy to hear that. I’m a single mother. Like you said, my name is [inaudible 00:02:15]. I’m 29. I joined No BS two years ago and it changed my life. I’m a coach now because of the work that I discovered in No BS. I just fell in love with all of it.

Yesenia:

I was a middle school teacher once upon a time. I did that for a few years, and then I was an author for five years after that. And then I fell in love with this and I never would’ve anticipated being a coach now, but it’s the best thing.

Yesenia:

I have two girls, so that’s another piece of this. Not just the work that I’ve done for me and getting my shit together these last couple of years, but also just knowing how much it’s impacting them and will continue to impact them. Every time I think about how their lives are being changed because of my work that I’m doing around my weight loss, around my mindset, around how much I’ve learned to love myself, it gets me every time. I’m so grateful that I’ve discovered this work at this point in my life.

Corinne:

I think that’s awesome. There were two things that drew me to you. If y’all don’t know, we call it the gauntlet. That’s how we interview coaches before we hire them. We put them through four to five interviews. It’s this extensive application process where we have you do a bunch of shit and then you got to go through all the coaches, and then they all have to agree that it’s like, “Okay, this one, oh yeah. I want to marry her.” We always call it you’re marrying someone when you hire them. They have to be willing to marry you.

Yesenia:

Yep.

Corinne:

Then you get to me, and then I just talk and whatnot. Number one was that you were an author. Tell them how many books you’ve written.

Yesenia:

I’ve written 19 and I’m talking to Coach Kim about making that 20th at some point.

Corinne:

Oh, my-

Yesenia:

We want to write something together because we were talking about how there’s just not enough books out there by women of color, especially around self-development.

Corinne:

That’s so funny you were talking about that because literally this morning … We had all, as a team, we were talking about that yesterday. We’re doing the … We have a new book study inside of No BS and that’s what we’re doing today, is we’re talking about the book that we are studying this month, and it’s called The Big Leap. It’s by Gay Hendricks who’s a white dude, and I believe he was a little older when he wrote it took. But we were just talking about how we really want to focus some of our books this year on women of color who have written motivational success books, like the things that all of us know we as women are studying.

Corinne:

Next month we’re doing The Body is Not An Apology, which we’ve already done a podcast on inside the podcast. But just how hard it is to find those books, and that … I love that you and Kim are talking about … I think this is important. There’s a need. There’s a big need. There would be … I would probably take more delight and pleasure out of you and Kim writing a book than the own damn book that I’m writing, and I’m not joking. If I could just have coaches who were also writing books … One of the things I love about having you guys, especially because you come up through the membership and stuff, is y’all don’t come here because you want a paycheck. Y’all come here because you fall in love with the mission that I have to help every woman feel amazing and lose her weight. I don’t know. Just to be able to keep seeing people want to do more of that in the world, it’s very humbling and very amazing for me.

Corinne:

She, one, is the whole author thing. And then the other thing that I loved about [inaudible 00:06:12] was just … It was her age. I think that it is not only important for women of color, but our young girls, and you were talking about your daughters. They need role models. They need people to look up to. They need to see people of their age getting their shit together, thinking like a boss ass bitch, doing all the things. Not to have a podcast love affair with you, but I guess that’s what we’re … Before we get into the book, I guess that’s what we’re doing today.

Yesenia:

I’m okay with that.

Corinne:

Anyway, let’s talk about book club. This year we decided finally we’re going to launch a book club. Our members have been asking for it forever. I’m always … If you listen to this podcast, you know I am a voracious self-development junkie. I read all the things, listen to all the things, and so I’m always telling our members about stuff I’m reading, and they have begged and begged for us to have a book club, so I’m like if Oprah and Reese Witherspoon can do it, so can I.

Yesenia:

Exactly. Yeah.

Corinne:

We tagged [inaudible 00:07:19] as the authority on it because she is an author and all the things. We’re going to talk about Big Leap today, which is a book that I read. It had been recommended to me for years. Literally for years I had heard about it in different groups that I was in. I heard a lot of weight loss people talk about it because the book is … Not only is it an easy read, but it’s short, but super impactful, and it talks about a problem that I have experienced, and I had never heard it articulated in such a way that … It literally was like the light bulbs were going off and-

Yesenia:

Yeah, me too.

Corinne:

As I read the book I was thinking about my members and how they hit what’s called this upper limit problem. An upper limit problem … I’ve watched my mom do this. I can give … If you ask me, I’ll give you plenty of examples, [inaudible 00:08:19], but upper limit problems are really simple. It’s where if you are doing something, your brain basically gets used to thinking and feeling a certain way. A lot of us can … I’ll apply this to weight loss. A lot of us can be really successful with diets. We can make ourselves do to get a goal, but we’re not really good at always changing who we are in the process. We just do a lot of forcing ourselves to do something.

Corinne:

When we get that goal and we’ve attached all of our happiness to it and that life’s going to be perfect and have this whole vision, what happens is we get there, we feel pretty good and stuff, but we’re used to feeling like shit, we’re used to will-powering, and we’re used to finding problems and tearing ourselves down and stuff, we deregulate ourselves. It’s called we hit the upper limit of feeling good. It’s like, oh no, something is wrong. I will give you a really good example of this.

Corinne:

My mother has struggled with money her entire life. She was a single mom too. Two kids. I’m sure that you can relate to Mammy when it comes to knowing it’s all on you.

Yesenia:

Yep.

Corinne:

From the age of 17 on, she made minimum wage, she had two kids, always trying to figure out … We were always hustling. I had to start working at the age of 12. Just all the things. She’s older now and one of the nice things about me being a business owner is I’m able to help my mother. It’s a dream of mine to be able to let her relax so that she never has to worry every again. I tell her all the time, “I’m going to buy this. I’m going to do this.”

Corinne:

The other day she came in to some huge financial problems where basically her bathrooms are no longer working. Her kitchen is going to need a total remodel. My mom ain’t got money. She never got to save. She always had to spend on us. There’s not a dope savings account somewhere.

Corinne:

I told her, I said, “I don’t want you worrying about this. I’m going to pay for all of it. Every bit of it,” and she’s like, “Yeah, but I’m going to … I know that you want to do for me and everything,” and I was like, “This year you’re not going to worry about money. Everything you owe, I’m taking care of it including your mortgage.” The privilege of doing what I do, it is to be able to do stuff like this. These are the things that drive me.

Corinne:

I tell my mother she has to … Not pay one penny this next year for anything. She immediately Marco Polo’s me and says, “I just want to let you know rent is expensive down here.” She’s got to go live somewhere for four months and I was like, upper limit issue. My mom couldn’t even spend five minutes and not worrying about money. She had to create a worry. And that is an example of an upper limit problem where you are … It’s like her brain is like, “No. We’re not … There’s no way that we can trust this is all going to be okay because we’ve never trusted it’s all going to be okay. We’ve spent our lives worrying about something.” We do this in weight loss too.

Yesenia:

Totally.

Corinne:

Let’s start with page 20. I just wanted to give everybody some context about it because when I read the book, the guy talks a lot about wealth and money, which you and I were just talking can be a touchy subject for some people. I said I don’t even remember it being so much about the money, and it’s because when I read books, no matter what the topic is, I am always trying to game the system on, I know this is got to apply to weight loss somehow. This is going to help my women. How is this going to help my women? To where I even the missed the point of that part. I was so focused on this is [inaudible 00:12:17]-

Yesenia:

What can I get out of it? Yeah. I’m going to get something good out of it.

Corinne:

[inaudible 00:12:19] My whole message was no wonder we fuck maintenance up so bad. That was the whole thing. This explains so much why some of us can’t get all the way to our goal. This explains so much why we blow ourselves up once we get what we want in our weight loss. We’re going to start with page 20 and Coach [inaudible 00:12:42] is going to talk about all of this.

Corinne:

“The inner thermostat setting …” This whole section was about why we self-sabotage in weight loss. I think he talks more about it in money, but he starts identifying how we find limiting beliefs. In my mother’s mind, her limiting beliefs is that she’ll never have enough money. Even if I give her all the money, she will figure out a way to think about, “Yeah, but this over here is broken.” It’s this compelling urge to-

Yesenia:

You know what it is?

Corinne:

[inaudible 00:13:21]

Yesenia:

Is because she identifies as, “I am somebody who always struggles with money,” and that’s why a lot of women self-sabotage. We’re doing, doing, doing, but at the core we still think, “I am someone who is overweight. I am someone who weighs in at this number,” and that is why we do that. We haven’t changed our idea of who we are. We haven’t looked at those limiting beliefs that we have about ourselves.

Corinne:

Yeah. It reminds me of a friend of mine. Back in the day when I first started coaching, I worked with this married couple. I remember having a conversation with the husband because he and I had been … We always talk about how we were just fat kids. We both had almost the identical story. We were very obese from a young age and we grew up obese. We were almost exactly the same age to the day. We had lost weight at about the same time. And we were both talking about how … He always said, “I’ll always have an inner fat kid.” He’s like, “That’s never going away.” His mindset was that he’ll just be a fit or thin guy with a fat kid trapped inside.

Corinne:

That is, I think, a cautionary tale for all of us, is that if you keep believing that, then you will set yourself up for losing your weight but keeping the mindset of someone who struggles with their weight. Most of us lose weight to get away from that struggle. We think once we lose the weight the struggles goes away. Not if you hang on to the identity of someone who’s always going to struggle.

Yesenia:

Yeah. I think step one for a lot of our ladies is even that self-awareness. A lot of our ladies don’t have that self-awareness that they have a limiting belief like this, that they identify like this. That’s step one. Identifying that voice in your brain when it comes up and says, “We’re supposed to struggle around this. This is who I am. I’m always going to be overweight. We’ve always struggled. Something is going to go wrong.”

Corinne:

When you’re working with your product lines and [inaudible 00:15:37], how do you help them find those voices? I think a lot of our clients don’t really hear them. How do you turn that on, essentially?

Yesenia:

One is journaling. Once you start writing out the things that you’re hearing in your head and you can see them on paper, it’s a lot easier to see what’s going on. Versus when it’s all just swirling around in your head and it feels hard to even grab one. Another one, is it’s just a practice to … You’re going to start to just pay attention what your brain is telling you throughout the day when you get an urge to eat, when you get the urge at night to go to the fridge. We just have to start listening to what our brain is saying. A lot of us … I didn’t do that for a long time, even after I joined No BS. It didn’t click for a while. I wasn’t even listening to anything that was going on up there.

Corinne:

I think it’s important … And I think that’s one of the reasons why we teach weight loss so different inside [inaudible 00:16:37], is I watch people all the time … I have friends in my real life who don’t listen to a word say, don’t listen to my podcast. Everybody thinks I’m some big ass expert except for my friends. [inaudible 00:16:54] “You’re just Corrine.” They want to ask me about Weight Watchers and all this other stuff and I’m like, “You do whatever you want.” So many of them, though, I watch them go up and down the scale our entire friendship because they are always trying to figure out what to do. They’re never asking themselves why are they not able to keep the weight off to begin with. It’s because they always keep these upper limit problems, these upper limit beliefs.

Corinne:

I think a common one for women is … For some people it’s, it’s just harder the older you get. It’s like they’ll work hard it, they’ll do a lot of stuff, and they’ll get frustrated and overeat, and then in a week when they don’t remember that they were eating because they had a bad day, in a week when they’re not losing weight and they’re only remembering all the hard work they did, they blame it on their weight. “It’s my age.”

Corinne:

[crosstalk 00:17:58]

Corinne:

I was just going to say when you hang onto that stuff and you don’t know that you’re having those thoughts, you’ve got to start dead stopping them. Otherwise you don’t know when you’re screwing yourself.

Yesenia:

Yeah. Ask yourself, why do I think I can’t lose weight? Why do I think I can’t keep it off? And that’ll start to get you some answers. One thing that I noticed with one of my private clients, her limiting belief was that everything is going so great in my life. I have a great job. It’s a great career. I’m a great boss to my employees. My money and my financials are great. I have great friends. And this is the one area where I guess it’s just … Not everything is supposed to be great. I guess I’m supposed to struggle in one area. Question that. Why don’t you deserve to have everything go great in your life?

Corinne:

Exactly. I think that’s a common one. People don’t realize … I see this a lot where people have this really good life and it’s this belief that somehow they don’t deserve it, or that the other shoe is going to drop. It’s like their brain is very oriented that it’s not supposed to be that good, so we go out and we create a problem to just keep ourselves down so that we can always be reminded, like, “Oh, no-“

Yesenia:

Exactly.

Corinne:

[inaudible 00:19:19]

Yesenia:

Who are we to have everything go so great? Who am I? Like you said, it goes back to, “I’m flawed. I’m unworthy. Maybe I don’t deserve this.”

Corinne:

It’s so weird how we … It makes you wonder especially in society, how we’ve gotten to this place where … A lot of people would just totally agree that we’re supposed to feel like shit, or that you’re not supposed to have everything, or that … They just have all these thoughts, and it’s like, how did we get, as a society, to really think that we can’t just love life and we can’t just be appreciative of it, and we can’t just create the life we want? Why is that not the normal? I think that’s good questions to ask, and I think that was one of the things I was really getting out of this book, is that we don’t have to … You don’t have to play small, and you don’t have to not love your life, and you don’t have to … There’s no loving it too much. There’s no appreciating it too much.

Corinne:

I always ask my weight loss clients, guys, if you sat around and you really just allowed yourself to truly be grateful for your stuff and you just truly decided, “I am worthy. I am done with the bullshit talking. I’m just done with all of that. I’m going to love myself.” The treating of yourself better comes along for the ride. It’s really hard to treat yourself well when you talk to yourself like a piece of trash.

Yesenia:

Yeah.

Corinne:

Nobody keeps their trash bags in the middle of the living room to admire.

Yesenia:

I was wondering when your first metaphor was going to come up, your first mental image.

Corinne:

There you go. Speaking of my son, yesterday, he’s writing poetry right now. Logan is my little [inaudible 00:21:19] man. He comes in with … He’s like, “I’m going to read you some poetry” from my 18 year old, and I was like, “Okay.” I didn’t have big expectations. And it was about the first two months of the year, and it was beautiful, and he was talking about how, “I really tried to go deep and paint the mental pictures for everyone,” and all this other [inaudible 00:21:39], and I was like, “Why don’t you just get a cigarette and smoke?” He just reminded me of some 50s …

Yesenia:

That’s so funny.

Corinne:

[inaudible 00:21:47] sitting around a coffee shop or something.

Corinne:

On page 34, they start talking about the zone of genius. “By age 40, many of us have tuned out the call to genius and are getting loud repeated alarms hidden in the form of depression, illness, injuries, and relationship conflicts.” Talk to us about this, because I always talk about when your feelings, especially your feelings and your actions … I always like to refer to it as your car dashboard. Negative feelings and negative actions are like the indicator lights on your car’s dashboard saying, “You need to check under the hood. Something is going on in that brain of yours, but you wouldn’t be thinking and feeling this way. And you wouldn’t be acting this way.” Talk to me about the zone of genius.

Yesenia:

He talks about a few different zones in the book, and the zone of genius is the highest one where what you’re doing, it doesn’t even feel like work. It feels like this is your talent, this is your gift. You get to do this. But a lot of us, we always say no, it’s not possible. We don’t do it. We’re stuck in jobs. Choose to stay in jobs sometimes that we hate, or just don’t make us happy. We say no to the things that we really want to do, to what’s calling to us, and so he’s talking about how we have tuned that out, but by that age you may not know what’s going on, but it’s presenting in … Like what he says, depression, illness, injuries, conflict popping up in your life. And I just thought that related back to weight loss too because a lot of us No BS women, we’re turning to food to feel better. I just thought that was interesting. That could be a symptom that ties back to this. Why are we-

Corinne:

[inaudible 00:23:38]

Corinne:

It’s almost like … Are you talking about where he’s saying we’re denying ourselves going after something we really want, and that denial is why we are compensating in this other area?

Yesenia:

Yeah. We’re trying to get joy out of our food to feel better because we’re just unhappy somewhere else.

Corinne:

I get that. I think I see a lot of our … Especially in the 40s and 50s, especially our 50 year olds, a lot of them will start … Their kids are graduating, going off to college. There’s just a lot going on for them, where they’re at this crossroads in life, and they’ve spent basically the first part of their life mothering or working and basically doing things because they think they should be doing it and it’s the right thing, and it’s what they’re supposed to do. And then when life settles in a little bit, it’s like, “I’m not even happy. Doing what I should do is not keeping me happy,” and so they have to figure out what’s next for me. I see that in particular happen with our empty nesters and stuff, where there’s this … It’s a gift and a curse. It’s a gift to have the space to figure out who you want to be and to have like, “Oh my gosh. Nothing is standing in my way and it’s a curse.” It’s like, “Oh, my gosh. Nothing is standing in my way of doing these things I’ve always told myself I couldn’t.”

Corinne:

It’s like when the rubber meets the road in those moments. Especially when it comes to weight loss, so many women put their weight loss off saying, “I can’t because of my kids, and I can’t because of my schedule, and I can’t because of all this stuff.” Then when the excuses leave, you’re left with the fear that you can’t do it.

Yesenia:

I’ve seen that with a career that they really want, like, “I can’t do it because I have little kids right now, so let me put it off,” and then that creates so much unhappiness too.

Corinne:

It’s comfortable to be complacent.

Yesenia:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Corinne:

It’s not thrilling. It’s not exciting. There’s not a lot of joy in it, but it’s also not terrible. It’s not scary to be complacent. It’s not risky to be complacent. You think about the feelings that we typically avoid. One of the reasons why we stay complacent is because we don’t have to deal with doubt, we don’t have to deal with risk, we don’t have to deal with scared and fear.

Yesenia:

Failure.

Corinne:

No. We don’t have to deal with any of that. But we also don’t get to feel excitement, amazement, courage, extreme joy, delight in ourselves. Those are also taken off the table too. It’s just really interesting. What did he call … Didn’t he have a name? I don’t know if you remember or not. I read it on Kindle, so I don’t have it in front of me. He said that we operate in this other zone, or am I thinking of a different book?

Yesenia:

No. There’s the zone of incompetence, the zone of competence, and then the zone of genius. [inaudible 00:26:53]

Corinne:

Okay.

Yesenia:

Maybe it’s competence that you’re talking about.

Corinne:

Yeah. That’s what I was thinking. I knew he called it something else, but yeah, that zone of competence. It’s safe but it’s not fulfilling.

Yesenia:

Yeah. It doesn’t light you up. It doesn’t feel like your true purpose.

Corinne:

Yeah. There’s always this missing thing. I think that’s really important for a lot of us. I know we’re a weight loss podcast and stuff, but I really believe that all of us need to do more work on figuring out what does light us up? What do we want to be doing with ourselves? It doesn’t mean that everybody has to go quit their job and go on a different pursuit, but there are things that we can put back on the table for ourselves. Just self-care. Self-care is an easy one. So many women, they just can’t do self-care and all this other stuff, and they get into that zone of complacency. And there’s something missing in their lives. It’s their own attention. They’re constantly seeking attention from other people because they’ve denied themselves their own attention for so long. If you keep denying yourself your own attention, the true self-care, yeah, you’re going to go outside yourself to try to find it. Good luck. It’s cold out there.

Corinne:

I have amazing people around me, but I will tell you, if I don’t give myself my own attention, it does not matter what all people tell me all the time. Just a good example. There is nobody right now that I know who probably gets more daily emails and thank yous, and my social posts and email. People are constantly like, “You’ve changed my life. Do you know you’re amazing?” All this junk.

Corinne:

But when I’m in my [inaudible 00:28:44] about myself, when I am not feeling good enough and stuff, that shit bounces off me like … It just ricochets. I don’t take it in. The first person to not like me cuts me to the core, because we have to, at some level, especially when it comes to weight loss, you have to be giving yourself your own attention. You have to quit being so complacent with just, “I’m getting by. I got through another day. I’m going to eat tonight.” It’s just really important. I don’t know.

Yesenia:

Yeah. I agree.

Corinne:

The last part that we wanted to highlight was page 64 and 66, and then on page 74 I had a quote on worry. I don’t have the quote. Do you have the quote?

Yesenia:

Yeah, I have the book in front of me.

Corinne:

Okay, good. I was going to read the quote and all it says is it’s a great way to handle worry that all of you guys might love.

Yesenia:

Yeah. I really liked his take on worry. It was a really useful strategy that he outlined. The quote is on page 74. He says, “One moment the thoughts have a grip on you, then you suddenly realize that it’s you who have the grip on them. You release the grip and the thoughts disappear. They come back again and you release them again.” He talks about it like a stress ball almost.

Corinne:

I think that’s so important, because I think when it comes to worry, I think a lot of us think that worry is necessary, worry is needed. Like my mother. I cannot tell you how many times.

Yesenia:

Or that the worry has control over you. It’s worry who’s dominating.

Corinne:

“I can’t help but worry.” Or “I’m supposed to worry about this.”

Yesenia:

Yes.

Corinne:

I don’t think so. I think that we’re supposed to do is focus on the areas of our life that we have total control over and the parts that we don’t, we just remember, “If I can’t control it or do something about it, it’s not worth thinking about.” It only drags me down.

Yesenia:

Yeah.

Corinne:

We have two good … If you’re a new listener, we have two really good podcasts on worry. It’s Worry 2.0 and The Worry Bucket. I don’t remember which ones they are, but you guys can go back and you can listen to those. For all of you who are chronic worriers … I don’t know why I always talk about my mom, but my mom is. I’ve always told her, I’m like, “Mama, quit making worry your habit.” It’s her habit. She just likes to sit around … Sometimes I ask her, “Do you just like sitting around doing that? Because you do it so well and so much, I’m beginning to think you take delight and pleasure out of it.” She’s like, “No, I don’t love it.”

Yesenia:

It’s funny how she worries, she has these limiting beliefs, but she lost 100 pounds. Apparently she didn’t let it stop her.

Corinne:

105 now. She’s like down 100 … All right. If my mother listens to this, she’s going to laugh her ass off. My mom does not … She knows I talk about her all the time. She is fine with this. My mother, in the last year, has not only lost 105 pounds, but she has retired so she doesn’t have to work anymore, which is what she always wanted. She is living in Florida. She left her home of all her life and her two babies, me and my brother in our 40s, we’re the babies, to get to Florida to live in a little house built in the 1950s with a pool, because she always wanted to be somewhere where it was warm and she could swim every day.

Corinne:

She has literally changed her life. My big present to her this year was, your money is now solved. You raised me. You gave everything up. Now I’m giving to you, so you can enjoy the rest of the years. Every day I talk to her she got some bullshit worry. She told me the other day, “I can’t help but think about this loose skin.” I said, “Mama, when you wanted to lose 100 pounds, that version of you is sitting there wanting to throw punch you right now.”

Yesenia:

That voice isn’t going away.

Corinne:

Yeah. I was like, my version of you was on a walker. She’s so glad you lost weight. You know what she’s saying? Get a grip. You’ve got loose skin. You know what we also got? Mobility. I just told her, “Start thinking about …” This is the thing for all of you. And this is what I loved about this whole book because it’s all about that upper limit. Start thinking about the shit you have. Stop thinking about what you don’t.

Yesenia:

Our brain is so good at defaulting to, “Let me look for what’s terrible. Let me look for what’s going to go wrong. Let me go look …” Yeah.

Corinne:

That’s what I loved about his whole book. It was this constant reminder of … What I think I loved was that … It’s like, oh, this is why we do this. We’re not broken. We just need to know this is what’s happening so that we can go to work on putting this behind us. I just thought this book was good. It’s one of those things where you’ll either love it or you’ll hate it. This is what’s hilarious when it comes to books. It doesn’t matter what I pick, somebody ain’t going to like it every single time. I know what’s going to happen. It’s even happened in our own book club. This is what I always like. I think of when our members come into my membership to bitch about shit that I like. I’d be like, “Y’all, do you not know who I am?” But we let them bitch and moan.

Corinne:

But this is the thing. He does talk a lot about money and wealth. I invite all of you to … Don’t read it from the perspective of money and wealth unless you’re wanting to work on your money and your wealth. Read it from the perspective of, you know what I want to do? I want to be the kind of person that can feel as good as I want without having to sabotage myself. If that is you, if you are tired of sabotaging yourself at that moment … How many of you have said this? “It just feels like the moment things start clicking and the moment everything is going smooth, it’s like I fuck it all up.” You do. And there’s a reason. And this books talks all about it.

Yesenia:

How many of our ladies have said, “I’ve lost weight the past two weeks in a row, and now all of a sudden I’m up five pounds. I don’t know what to do. I’m broken. I knew I couldn’t figure this out.” This book will explain all of that.

Corinne:

Read it with that mindset of, how does this apply to weight loss? How does this apply to my weight loss? You do that, and I really think this book could be a game changer for a lot of you. If you’re in the membership, again, we’re studying it. We have our own book club that [inaudible 00:36:06] pulls together a study guide for us. She takes us through … Tell us about what you’re doing in the book club. Everything that they get inside the book club. The members who are listening will start jumping in to our future ones.

Yesenia:

We have the Facebook group where you can jump in and post and share whatever you’re getting from the book as you’re reading it. I’m sharing journal prompts and discussion questions every week so that you can take the work deeper and apply it to weight loss. And we’re all reading the book together, and we’re getting a lot out of it, talking about it, sharing about it. Lots of ahas, even around the zone of genius and “This is getting me thinking about my life and what I want for myself. Just really taking our work in the membership deeper, and this was a great book to start off with, because it’s really about, “I feel like I’ve been trapped in this box my whole life, and it turns out, what? There’s a door that I can just open and walk through?”

Corinne:

Right. Do you do videos with them too?

Yesenia:

We’ve not done videos, not for this book. We’re considering. We’re always taking feedback and we’re always looking for ways to make the book study better, so we’ve seen a few comments around members maybe wanting a call or a video, so we’re definitely looking at all of that and-

Corinne:

You should do a call.

Yesenia:

Yeah. Just allowing the book study to evolve. It’s not set in stone. I’m definitely paying attention to what the ladies want.

Corinne:

I know that you’re going to help a lot of women this year, leading our book study, and bringing your insights, and guiding them. I just think that one of the things that I found important inside of No BS is that people are not just learning from me. I learn from many different people and I want our women learning from many different people with different backgrounds, different mindsets, different approaches, just that different thinking process and set of eyes and stuff. From authors to different coaches and all the things. I think book club this year is going to be a really special place for our members to be able to connect on another level. I appreciate you doing it.

Yesenia:

I love it. As soon as Kathy told me that I was going to get to lead a book study, I was like, “Are you kidding me? This is the best. I get to geek out on books and self-development?”

Corinne:

You mean you get to do something in your zone of genius?

Yesenia:

Yeah.

Corinne:

As it states on page 34.

Yesenia:

Yeah.

Corinne:

Thank you for being on the podcast today and y’all, if you got friends that need help, please send them over to nobsfreetraining.com. They can pick up my free course. You can share the podcast. All you got to do is take a screen shot of this podcast, post it on your social. Use the hashtag #nobswoman. That’s the one I follow and I love commenting and liking and following a lot of you. If you share the podcast and you are doing the things, I’m sure we will cross paths on social media one day. Until next time, y’all take care. Bye y’all.

Yesenia:

Bye.

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I'm Corinne Crabtree

Corinne Crabtree, top-rated podcaster, has helped millions of women lose weight by blending common-sense methods with behavior-based psychology.

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